Link Roundup! – 2/26/16

Link Roundups feature articles and bits of internet goodness that our dramaturgy team digs up. If you find something you want to send our way, drop us a line on Facebook or Twitter!

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 The playwright Kirsten Greenidge, whose “Baltimore” is a beneficiary of the Big Ten New Play Initiative. Credit Kayana Szymczak for The New York Times

The playwright Kirsten Greenidge, whose “Baltimore” is a beneficiary of the Big Ten New Play Initiative. Credit Kayana Szymczak for The New York Times

The New York Times highlights C1 playwright alum Kirsten Greenidge in a story about the Big Ten New Play Initiative:

Giving more such practice to female undergraduates is a major objective of the program that commissioned “Baltimore” and is rolling it out in productions at several universities this academic year. The Big Ten New Play Initiative — yes, schools better known for football or basketball are behind it — has begun seeding the canon with a fresh crop of works by women.

Naomi Iizuka, Rebecca Gilman and Madeleine George are the other playwrights tapped so far for the project, which is intended in part to address one of American theater’s most pressing concerns: the need to put more plays by women onstage. But the initiative goes a significant step further. Each script is bound by just one rule, said Alan MacVey, who oversees the $10,000 commissions: It must include at least six substantial roles for young women.

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A group of 27 women and people of color talk about what it’s like to work in Hollywood for a huge feature for the New York Times:

In 1985, I’m sitting in the casting office of a major studio. The head of casting said, “I couldn’t put you in a Shakespeare movie, because they didn’t have black people then.” He literally said that. I told that casting director: “You ever heard of Othello? Shakespeare couldn’t just make up black people. He saw them.” I started carrying around a postcard of Rubens’s “Studies of the Head of a Negro.” The casting director actually was very kind to me. He referred me to my first agent.

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Teacher Carol Hunt encourages students in her kindergarten class to emulate wild animals during an arts-integrated math lesson at Westlawn Elementary School on Feb. 18 in Falls Church, Va. (Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

Teacher Carol Hunt encourages students in her kindergarten class to emulate wild animals during an arts-integrated math lesson at Westlawn Elementary School on Feb. 18 in Falls Church, Va. (Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

The Washington Post has a story about a program that pairs art teachers with early-childhood educators to formulate math lessons:

This giggly play session actually was a serious math lesson about big and small and non-standard measurements. Dreamed up by Richardson and kindergarten teacher Carol Hunt, it aims to get the children to think of animal steps as units of measurement, using them to mark how many it takes each animal to get from a starting line to the target.

Teachers call such melding of art and traditional subjects “art integration,” and it’s a new and increasingly popular way of bringing the arts into the classroom. Instead of art as a stand-alone subject, teachers are using dance, drama and the visual arts to teach a variety of academic subjects in a more engaging way.

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Former Street Team member David Castillo wrote a piece for NBC online about his take on #OscarsSoWhite:

Now that I am an actor and model, I know that progress is being made. Shows like Jane The Virgin and Orange is the New Black have brought forward a variety of Latino experiences to English speaking, American audiences – something that did not exist while I was growing up. To see Amaury Nolasco and José Moreno Brooks both play characters that are considered beautiful on Telenovela is not just hilarious, but comforting. Seeing actors like Nolasco on screen 10 years ago would have made such a huge difference in my life.