Link Roundup! – 3/13/15

Link Roundups feature articles and bits of internet goodness that our dramaturgy team digs up. If you find something you want to send our way, drop us a line on Facebook or Twitter!

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Playwright Bess Wohl at the Abrons Arts Center Playhouse. Photo: Cassandra Giraldo for The Wall Street Journal

Playwright Bess Wohl at the Abrons Arts Center Playhouse. Photo: Cassandra Giraldo for The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal has an article up about playwrights who write for film and television, examining the way it allows for a more sustainable income than theatre:

In the nonprofit theater, playwrights like Ms. Wohl earn income from grants, commissions and in some cases fees from regional and international productions of their work. Only for a small handful does this accumulate to a living wage.

In TV, on the other hand, a complex system of generous minimums is in place to determine compensation for writers, whose salaries and fees vary based on a variety of factors, including a show’s length and where it is being broadcast or streamed.

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The Guardian takes a look at childcare and parent-friendly practices in theatre with their article “Parents in the arts need to stage a childcare revolution”: 

Of course it’s not just women who are affected by such responsibilities. But perhaps one of the reasons that there are fewer female theatre directors sustaining longer-term careers is that it’s hard to juggle family and directing. Plenty of women set out to be directors, but then when children come along, it is far harder to keep going alongside caring responsibilities which still often fall primarily upon women…Maybe that explains why only 29% of directors in big theatres are female.

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Blogger Vu Le from Nonprofit With Balls gives some suggestions for how to increase the diversity of non-profit boards and leadership in the face of stark statistics:

But the huge problem with our sector’s diversity strategies is that they increase demand without increasing supply. Doing this just ups the burden that leaders of color have to bear. The focus on equity and cultural competencies have led to us being approached constantly to be involved or to give pro-bono guidance. Nonprofit leaders of color like me stretch ourselves thin, engaged in multiple efforts outside our organizations. We do it because we know well-meaning-but-actually-terrible decisions (aka, WMBAT decisions) often get made if we’re not there.

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With the issue of net neutrality on the minds of many, ARTSblog writes about how the recent legislation impacts the arts with more information about Arts Advocacy Day and how you can help:

For several years, net neutrality concerns have been a part of our annual message to Congress as part of Arts Advocacy Day. This year, it is again, and on March 23 as part of workshop training for Arts Advocacy Day attendees (PS: There is still time to register!), there will be a special breakout session on the topic with policy experts.