Link Roundup! – 2/6/15

Link Roundups feature articles and bits of internet goodness that our dramaturgy team digs up. If you find something you want to send our way, drop us a line on Facebook or Twitter!

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Over at HowlRound, Yvette Heyliger wrote a post about her petition calling for new legislation mandating that nonprofit arts organizations and institutions receiving tax-payer dollars must allocate an equitable portion of that funding to women artists:

The 2013 Women Stage the World Parade in Manhattan’s Theatre District. Photo by Jeff Colen Photography.

The 2013 Women Stage the World Parade in Manhattan’s Theatre District. Photo by Jeff Colen Photography.

This petition is one way to create a seat at the table of artistic opportunity. In 2015, women continue to find themselves at the children’s table, sitting on chairs too small, eating from mix-matched dishes and drinking from plastic cups. The petition is simple and straightforward. With only initials and perhaps states as identifying markers, all are welcome to sign. If the petition receives 100,000 signatures by February 6, 2015, an official response from the White House will be issued.

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Playwright Marcus Gardley has a great interview on the Art Works blog about his creative process and the way he views playwriting as social activism:

GARDLEY: I consider myself an activist, and I couldn’t do it if I wasn’t hoping that the work would somehow spark a dialogue, or somehow cause people to look at social issues differently. What I intend for [the plays] to do, is cause conversation afterward. From that conversation, [I hope] people are not only inspired to see more theater, but also inspired to do things in their community, so that the work is actually, literally causing a spark for change.

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Jeff Vespa/Getty Images

Jeff Vespa/Getty Images

Sundance Film Festival is running now and Vulture is taking a look at the festival’s poor track record at boosting the careers of many female and minority filmmakers in attendance:

This article is no knock at either of those talented men. But it is indicative of the way that major studios tend to approach Sundance: They swoop in, pluck up all the white-guy directors, and leave all the talented female and nonwhite helmers to fend for themselves. If you’re a white dude who made a micro-budget Sundance movie with some visual panache, you’re sure to end up on studio short lists; if you’re not, you’ll struggle to even get financing for your next project. And that’s a shame, because Sundance is a film festival positively bursting with talented, break-the-mold directors who, if hired, could put a big dent in Hollywood’s diversity problem.

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For those who like a little intersectional feminist theory mixed with pop culture and a dash of ’90s nostalgia, this saved by the bell hooks Tumblr is for you:

savedbythebellhooks